Purchasing organisations launches new £750m framework

YPO’s head of public sector Gavin Rimmington

Publicly owned purchasing body YPO, has launched a new national network and telecommunications frameworks valued at £650m.

The first-of-its kind framework has been created by the Wakefield-based organisation to offer a full range of connectivity and communication technology services to all public sector organisations, from blue light to central and local government as they look to adopt digital practices.

The framework will include sourcing, procurement, delivery and support for local area networks, wide area networks, cyber security, digital fibre infrastructure, smart cities and internet of things, communications services, and mobile, voice and data solutions.

There are currently 37 suppliers available on the framework, including Talk Talk Business Direct and Telefonica UK – however over half of the suppliers are SMEs, helping public sector organisations to generate greater social value through their spending.

YPO’s head of public sector Gavin Rimmington, said: “The launch of this framework will reassure the public sector that we’re here to support organisations through a period of digital transformation. It’s no secret that we’re all facing more pressure to adopt digital practises while still maintaining operational and financial stability.

“Utilising the combined expertise of our suppliers and YPO, the network connectivity and telecommunications framework provides clear and easily implementable solutions, significant financial value for money and continuous guidance throughout the life of awarded contracts. To add to this, sourcing multiple, highly competent SME providers to serve the framework has meant that organisations can stimulate local economic growth through their spend.”

YPO has been in the headlines recently after it sought to purchase Findel Education late in 2019 in a deal valued at £50m which the the Competition and Markets Authority found in a provisional report earlier this month could, leave schools worse off.

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